The best way to keep users occupied is to produce long videos that strategically disperse valuable information throughout the duration of the entire video. Videos that hit the 10-minute mark are often able to achieve significantly higher watch time than those that cram too much information into a short video or those that don’t cover a topic thoroughly enough to retain their audience. The average length of page one YouTube videos is 14 minutes 50 seconds.
Professional cameras, like DSLRs, give you fine control over the manual settings of shooting video and allow you to achieve the shallow depth of field (background out of focus) that people rave about. While they're primarily used for photography, DSLRs are incredibly small, work great in low light situations, and pair with a wide range of lenses — making them perfect for video. However, DSLRs do require some training (and additional purchases) of lenses.
Asking people to subscribe to your channel is a must-do — and yes, people will actually subscribe just because you ask! But if you give them a reason to, they’re even more likely to hit that red button. “Subscribe so you get my next video first!” or “My subscribers get exclusive content” and “Subscribe so you can enter my giveaway” are examples of language to try.

A clever innovation used in this video was after the first nine seconds of the video, when the note annotations changed over to spotlight annotations. Expert Village used both forms of annotations on this video series because note annotations draw more attention and take over more of the screen visually; therefore changing over to spotlight annotations after the first nine seconds removes the more distracting calls to action from the video experience, but still keeps them in a smaller form with the use of spotlight.
In the above example, Zappos chose to title their video 5 Ways to Cuff Your Jeans! as a means of making viewers with style questions aware that Zappos is here to help style your clothing as well as offer some for sale. The title is more likely to be found by someone not searching for Zappos specifically, but more so for someone looking for help styling jeans. Zappos used the title of the video to help illustrate the video’s purpose of providing a service to viewers. In the end, helping bring the video in front of a relevant audience for Zappos.
Did you know that organic engagement is highest on Facebook when posts contain videos? Or that simply including the word “video” in your email’s subject line can increase open rates by 19 percent? One company went as far as to test whether video thumbnails in an email newsletter would increase engagement and they found that it was quite successful. They reported that nearly 41 percent more people engaged with the email if it had a video thumbnail, as opposed to a static image or just text.
17. Add your logo as a watermark — This is another great branding opportunity, as your logo will appear in the lower right corner of your videos as a clickable link leading back to your channel page. To upload your logo, go to https://www.youtube.com/branding. The image for the watermark should be a PNG or GIF file (1MB max) and ideally have a transparent background.
Within your channel itself, you can also organize videos into playlists, making it easy for your audience to search within your content. As a social platform, viewers can engage with your videos by liking and commenting on them, providing you another chance to interact with your audience. YouTube also offers a variety of advertising options for more sophisticated targeting.
Did you know that organic engagement is highest on Facebook when posts contain videos? Or that simply including the word “video” in your email’s subject line can increase open rates by 19 percent? One company went as far as to test whether video thumbnails in an email newsletter would increase engagement and they found that it was quite successful. They reported that nearly 41 percent more people engaged with the email if it had a video thumbnail, as opposed to a static image or just text.
According to Google, “93 percent of millennials go to YouTube to learn how to do something.” Since YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google, and studies show “how-to content” earns more attention than any other category, this is a great opportunity to showcase the employees that your clients will actually come face to face with at some point. By demonstrating your professional expertise and allowing visitors a chance to become more familiar with your team, you’re killing two birds with one stone. Plus, these videos can encourage interaction between you and your viewers if you ask them for future topics of discussion, feedback, questions, etc. in the form of comments or messages.
A clever innovation used in this video was after the first nine seconds of the video, when the note annotations changed over to spotlight annotations. Expert Village used both forms of annotations on this video series because note annotations draw more attention and take over more of the screen visually; therefore changing over to spotlight annotations after the first nine seconds removes the more distracting calls to action from the video experience, but still keeps them in a smaller form with the use of spotlight.
What I like about it is that when users hover over the image, they can see some basic information about your channel (name of the channel and number of subscribers) and when they click on the image they are redirected to your channel. This is especially useful for videos embedded on other websites. It allows people to be redirected to your channel and subscribe if they enjoyed the video, even if they are not on YouTube to begin with.
You can choose a feature video from any of your uploads, or create a video specifically for this purpose. I recommend doing the latter; it allows you to create a short video (no more than 90 seconds, preferably) to welcome viewers to your channel and explain what you can offer them. This brief clip may not seem like a big deal, but in my experience it can go a long way in getting people to subscribe.
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